5 things that make Ubuntu Linux the most promising Linux distro in the world.

Ubuntu Linux is, without doubt, poised to be the Windows of the Linux world in the future. Giving the aggressive moves being undertaken by Canonical, Ubuntu’s parent company, I have no doubt that Ubuntu is sure to become the flagship OS of the Linux world. The following 5 points should help clarify my view.
Philosophy.
The philosophies that underlie Ubuntu are very noble tenets that virtually everybody would love to align themselves to. This makes it’s usage more appealing to lots of people from divergent cultures and belief systems.
Ease of use.
There are those that will disagree with this point. However, relatively speaking, it is the most easy to use Linux distro out there. It’s appeal to lots of new users attests to this fact. This makes it more and more appealing to prospective users and thus further future popularity.
Rate of growth.
Ubuntu is, without doubt, the fastest growing Linux distro out there. The future of any OS depends largely on its current growth rate, Ubuntu passes this litmus test with flying colors.
User base
Ubuntu has one of the largest, if not the largest user base of any Linux distro out there. And by user base, I mean users that are deeply attached to the OS. Users that deeply love and staunchly publicize their OS with more coming on board everyday. Such users can only move the distro to higher heights.
Market Expansion
Given the recent spate of expansion of the ecosystem surrounding Ubuntu- from Ubuntu One, Ubuntu Cloud, Ubuntu Server, Ubuntu -Dell partnership among others- there is no gainsaying  that Ubuntu is sure to be the Linux distro of choice in the future for both individuals and corporate customers.
For these five and possibly more other reasons, i strongly believe that Ubuntu stands among the lot as the most promising OS in the Linux world.
What do you think? Do you agree about Ubuntu’s future position as the market leader in the Linux distro world? Share your thoughts.

13 Replies to “5 things that make Ubuntu Linux the most promising Linux distro in the world.”

  1. Noble tenets… So, who pays the license fees for those non-free codecs that, while not in the Ubuntu install, are available in Ubuntu repos?

    Or is it okay to steal if you can get away with it?

    Playing the devils advocate here, of course, but until Canonical makes Ubuntu legal in both the word and spirit of the law, I don't think they (or their users) have any moral high ground to stand on.

  2. I'd use Oogoobooboo if it didn't have such amateur names or looks like it was run by a bunch non-professionals. I don't use an operating system based on it's name. Telling someone I use Oogoobooboo Lactating Llama would be embarrassing.

  3. No, because OS X is actually run by real professionals and things like Leopard, etc aren't the same as stupid names like Hairy Hardon like Oogoobooboo does.

  4. 5 Reasons why it isn't:

    1.) Ubuntu doesn't do a lot of developing for the Linux community. That makes it a follower, and not a leader. Apple is a leader, Microsoft is a follower. Guess who has more market share? Red Hat/Fedora and Novell are leaders. The two of them have contributed incredible amounts of code and innovation into the Linux and FOSS ecosystem. Ubuntu relies on the work of others, then markets the crap out of it. Sounds a lot like Microsoft to me.

    2.) Ease of use is not there. If you want ease of use, pick up a copy of Mandriva. I bet you never open a single terminal or even run a single command in Krunner to do anything at all. They have it down where the user can fire up the Mandriva Control Center and configure, via GUI, anything they need to on their system. Ubuntu? If the scripts don't get it right, have fun in the forums and wiki…

    3.) It's a money loser. Mark Shuttleworth has made it clear that this is a business venture and that Ubuntu needs to stand on it's own legs at some point. There has largely been speculation about how much money he sinks into Ubuntu yearly because it's not a public company, but he's admitted very recently that he continues to support Ubuntu's shortfall in earnings out of his own pocket. There will be a limit to his patience. At that point, he'll write off his losses and pull the plug. Then what? Okay, some say the community will step in. Well, why aren't they stepping in now to make it at least break even to continue its future? It'll wither and die. Fedora and OpenSuse are tied to very popular corporate distros and will be around for a long, long time.

    4.) The user base is just as much a liability as an asset. As the user base gets bored, they look elsewhere. It's very common for new users to look around and see what else is out there. Some go back and others permanently leave. It's called "distro hopping". In time, they'll all take that look around.

    5.) The market history of Linux has been that there is a dominant player, then it slides downhill and gets unseated by a new player that dominates for a while, only for the cycle to begin again. Red Hat once reigned supreme. They got all the hype in the press that Ubuntu currently gets, and you actually had to purchase it. Let Ubuntu try that! They were unseated by Mandriva, who forked from them by providing a KDE version of Red Hat, only to go their own way and develop great tools such as the control center and URPMI, which, in it's early days, was on-par with Apt-get. Then, they were unseated by Ubuntu because they got too big for their pants and began to irritate their user base. Both Red Hat and Mandriva (actually Mandrake at the time) were just as dominant in the marketplace as Ubuntu currently is, in their time at the top. Suse was making strides to unseat Mandriva, but the Novell purchase changed that. Ubuntu didn't rise to the top out of greatness. Instead, they came along at the right time and in the right place. Red Hat did away with their home desktop distro and aligned with Fedora, who was in its infancy and was more than a little rough around the edges, Suse was sold to Novell and spooked its user base, and Mandriva pushed its users into a paid club membership that had little benefits and angered them. Linux users have jumped ship in masses before, and they'll do it again.

  5. "Apple is a leader, Microsoft is a follower. Guess who has more market share?"

    Microsoft, duh. They have over 20 times the market share of Apple on the desktop.

  6. @ruel24
    your point no 1 is countered by the fact that despite being a follower as you say, MS Windows is the world's market leader and will remain so for the foreseeable future.
    Like i said, you can disagree with me on ease of use of Ubuntu, but it still remains a fact that it is one of the easiest distros you can use.
    Like all business men, Mark knows that to make money in a near perfectly competitive market like the one Ubuntu is in will take time,patience and a lot investment.
    Ubuntu, will not suffer the distro shopping effect as you put it. You can conduct your own poll on the Ubuntu forums and you will understand what i mean what i mean.
    All the times you referred to in your last point are different from each other. Ubuntu will not be easily toppled by another distro as you say if all the strategic ecosystem Canonical is building around it should succeed.

  7. First of all, Bentley is the "flagship" of the VW Group, despite that they sell far more VWs, Seats… Sales volume does not constitute a "flagship". Microsoft is a follower and is considered "run of the mill". Apple is a leader, and their products are considered "premium".

    I love it when the Ubuntu drones talk about how easy it is to use, yet as soon as someone asks a question on how to do something, the responses are "open a terminal and type 'sudo…'". What? I thought it was easy to use? Have you ever even tried Mandriva? PCLinuxOS? You're likely to never need to open a terminal and type anything at all, unless you want to. That is easy to use…

    Honestly, I think your points have no validity. The points your try to make to not all hinge on a hope and a prayer that Ubuntu actually starts making money. And what if it doesn't? Are you going to slobber all over the next dominant player? Ubuntu isn't a bad distro, at all. It just isn't the next OS X…actually isn't even remotely close…

    Mark Shuttleworth goes on and on about how we need to improve Linux. But, it's open source…he can do with it what he wants. But, guess what? He doesn't. This is a flagship? If you want to see who the movers and shakers are in the Linux ecosystem, take a long hard look at Red Hat/Fedora and Novell/Suse. If there is a "flagship" Linux company, that would be Red Hat. They've done more for open source and Linux than any other company. The money they spend on open source development makes Ubuntu look like a blip on the map.

  8. "First of all, Bentley is the "flagship" of the VW Group, despite that they sell far more VWs, Seats… Sales volume does not constitute a "flagship". Microsoft is a follower and is considered "run of the mill". Apple is a leader, and their products are considered "premium"."

    You basically just shifted the goalposts. You asked who had the larger market share not which one was the "flagship" or considered "premium". Market share is defined as "the percentage or proportion of the total available market or market segment that is being serviced by a company". And by that metric Microsoft has the far larger market share by over a factor of 20.

  9. Ummm. no I didn't. I'm making a point about it being a "flagship". A flagship brand is one that stands above all others in the mindset, not in sales. Cadillac is the flagship of GM, not Chevrolet.

  10. "Ummm. no I didn't. "

    Umm, yes you did. You asked: "Apple is a leader, Microsoft is a follower. Guess who has more market share? "

    The answer is Microsoft by over a factor of 20. Then after hearing this you change it to being which one is the "flagship" which wasn't what you originally said and by which you define arbitrarily.

    "A flagship brand is one that stands above all others in the mindset, not in sales."

    Bullshit. A flagship brand is by definition "a company's primary moneymaker or originating product". Cadillac is neither GM's primary moneymaker nor it's originating product.

  11. Wrong. You're trying to slice and dice what I said. I said "Ubuntu doesn't do a lot of developing for the Linux community. That makes it a follower, and not a leader. Apple is a leader, Microsoft is a follower. Guess who has more market share?" Meaning, because it has more marketshare, doesn't make a leader, or a "flagship".

    And, you're wrong. A flagship brand is one, by definition, according to Merriam-Webster, "the finest, largest, or most important one of a series, network, or chain" – in other words, the one with the most prestige. The Cadillac Fleetwood was once the flagship of the Cadillac line, not markeshare or sales volume.

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